If I ever get to visit The National Archives

I’m starting a list of documents I need to consult when I get time to visit The National Archives:

In 1677 the Admiralty introduced examinations for prospective lieutenants to test whether individuals had the necessary experience and skills. They were awarded a certificate if they passed. These certificates, which can provide information about a man’s service prior to the exam, usually recorded the age, date and place of birth of the officer as well as the names of the ships he had served on – Alfred Young

Royal Navy lieutenants’ passing certificates 1691-1902 / by Bruno Pappalardo

Official warrant and commission documents from the Admiralty

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I have discovered some records relating to my ancestors held by the Caird Library at the National Maritime Museum. I was able to pay for these records to be scanned and they were sent to me last week.

Within ADL/2/19 there were four records – two relating to Henry Harper who I am related to by marriage, one for Thomas Mansel and one for Alfred Young. I have transcribed the ones relating to my ancestors and they are official warrant and commission documents from the Admiralty.

ADL/2/19 Thomas Mansel

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

To Thomas Mansel Esq. hereby appointed Captain of His Majesty’s Ship Royal William

By virtue of the power and authority to us given we do hereby constitute and appoint you Captain of His Majesty’s Ship the Royal William willing and requiring you forthwith to go on board and take upon you the charge and command of Captain in her accordingly, Strictly Charging and Commanding all the Officers and Company of the said ship to behave themselves jointly and severally in their respective Employments, with all due Respect and Obedience unto you their said Captain and you likewise to observe and execute the General Printed Instructions and such Orders and Directions as you shall from time to time receive from us or any other your Superior Officers for His Majesty’s Service.

Hereof nor you nor any of you may fail as you will answer the Contrary at your Peril. And for so doing this shall be your Warrant. Given under our hands and the Seal of the Office of Admiralty this twelfth day of February 1834. In the Fourth Year of His Majesty’s Reign.

By Command of their Lordships ….

ADL/2/19 Alfred Young

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

To Lieutenant Alfred Young hereby appointed Lieutenant of Her Majesty’s Ship the St Vincent

By virtue of the Power and Authority to us given We do hereby constitute and appoint you Lieutenant of Her Majesty’s Ship St Vincent Willing and requiring you forthwith to go on board and take upon you the Charge and Command of Lieutenant in her accordingly, Strictly Charging and Commanding all the Officers and Company belonging to the said ship subordinate to you to behave themselves jointly and severally in their respective Employments with all due Respect and Obedience unto you their said Lieutenant. And you likewise to observe and execute as well the General printed Instructions and such Orders and Directions you shall from time to time receive from your Captain or any other your superior Officers for Her Majesty’s service.

Hereof nor you nor any of you may fail as you will answer the contrary at your peril. And for so doing this shall be your Commission. Given under our hands and the Seal of the Office of Admiralty this First day of July 1858 in the Twenty Second Year of Her Majesty’s Reign.

By Command of their Lordships ….

Seniority 7 March 1842

For Service in Ordinary [illegible]

 

Coastguards of Ireland 1850s

I have a few ancestors who were in the Royal Navy, and joined the Coastguard towards the end of their careers. Perhaps this kind of job was more compatible to family life?

My grand father was called Henry Harper and I was always intrigued what inspired this name. Sometimes a mothers maiden name was used as a middle name and I thought this might be the case.

Coastguards of Ireland 1850s

However I recently came across a Henry Harper who was a coastguard in Ireland in the 1850’s and he is connected to a branch of my family via his second wife, Julia Young, who he married on 5th February 1850. Julia Young was the daughter of Matthew Young, Commander RN. At the time Julia young was living in Dunmore.

Henry Harper was the Chief Officer at Ballymacaw Coastguard Station from 1848-1850. Henry died 16th Jan 1870 at Heath Mount, Castletown, Co Cork, a Staff Commander RN, aged 56 (buried at St Andrews Dunmore East).  Julia died 23rd May 1877 at Toureen Terrace, Passage West, County Cork aged 63.

This makes Henry Harper the great-uncle (step-uncle?) of Henry Harper Young. As he was only born in 1895 it seems strange that he was possibly named after him. Perhaps he met his father Mansel Young who was born around 1855 and made a big impression on him?

Alfred Young 1811-1861

I have been trying to find out more about the death of Alfred Young who died aged only 50.

His place of death was recorded as Priory Fratton in Portsmouth. I wondered if this might be a workhouse or similar – today it is a school.

This evening I managed to find a record of his Will  in Ireland, Calendar of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1920 held by National Archives Ireland. The record is dated 1866, 5 years after his death.

The record shows his effects were under £100 in England and Ireland. “Letters of Administration Intestate herein granted at the District Registry at Winchester 8 February 1866. Resealed at the Principle Registry Dublin  14 April 1866. ”

I’m not sure why this needed to be recorded in Ireland.

Searching the collections of Royal Museums Greenwich

A few days ago I decided to google some names I was researching. Years ago I found a record of Alfred Young’s marriage in Ireland. Stupidly I failed to take a copy of the record and cannot find it online any more. I am trying to be more careful and make copies and scans of all my records to keep them safe.

I love the fact there are still so many records to be found! I was lucky and found more records by searching the collections of Royal Museums Greenwich. There I found ADL/Z/19:

Commissions of Staff Cdr Henry Harper, Capt Thomas Mansel and Lt Alfred Young, and other documents.

Commissions and appointments of Staff Cdr Henry Harper, 4 Dec 1843-16 Feb 1865; Commission of Capt Thomas Mansel (1783-1869), 12 Feb 1834; Commission of Lt Alfred Young, 1 Jul 1858; Letter from Henry Elliott, War Office, to Mrs Macdermott of Fitzroy Square regarding a compassionate allowance, 14 Aug 1815; Printed programme and poem relating to the Spithead Naval Review in honour of the Sultan of Turkey, 17 Jul 1867; ‘The Military and Naval Medal Magazine’, Vol 1 No 1, Oct 1895.
I am interested in the records relating to Thomas Mansel and Alfred Young, whom I’m directly related to. I’m also intrigued by the name Henry Harper, as this is the name given to my grandfather, the grandson of Alfred Young. I always wondered where it came from and it looks like I might find out.
I have contacted the Royal Museums Greenwich and am hoping I can purchase a scan of the records they hold, or try and visit in person. You can search their collections by archive, objects or their library.

National Probate Calendar entry for Alfred Young 1866

I discovered this record from the National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995 for Alfred Young  who died in 1861.

I wonder why it took 5 years for his widow to claim this?

It also gives new information as to her address is 1866 as Florence Cottage, Florence Road, New Southsea, Portsea.