{New} England & Wales Electoral Registers 1920-1932

In partnership with the British Library, Find My Past have recently added over 16 million names to the England & Wales Electoral Registers collection. Voting lists are compiled annually of people who are eligible to vote and include their reason for eligibility, such as their residence or ownership of a property. You’re likely to find your ancestor featured more than once.

Electoral Registers can reveal fascinating facts for your family tree including:

  • Your relatives’ names and addresses
  • Their occupations or ages (sometimes)
  • The year of the register
  • Nature of qualification or a description of the property
  • The name, description and residence of the landlord or other person to whom rent is paid
  • The polling district or place and constituency your ancestors were registered

This invaluable record set includes those first entitled to vote after 1918 and is an excellent substitute for the lost 1931 England & Wales Census.

First World War Pension ledgers

To honour Memorial Day and the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, I was able to get free access to Fold3 last week. I hadn’t heard of this site until I was browsing Ancestry and found a record on Fold3. I wasn’t willing to pay for access, so was happy to wait and I was rewarded!

The record was for my great uncle, Alfred Mansel Young. He died in the First World War and there was a record of him in the Pension ledgers. He died on 24th July 1916 and his father, Mansel Young, made a claim. It shows his address as 6 Woodland Street, Kingston, Portsmouth. It looks like a summary rather than a full record with any correspondence, but it was still good to discover.

First World War Pension ledgers

 

List of Alien Passengers {Rita St Clair Cole}

The last document I wanted to share (going through recent finds) was a really interesting one I found recently. It shows a distant relation, Rita St Clair Cole who voyaged on a ship  (part  of  the  Allan  line)  to  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in October 1914.passenger lists

Unfortunately I can’t read much of the information apart from her name, that she was 22 years old and single.

I can’t read her occupation (possibly Housekeeper), her last permanent residence, name and address of nearest relative or final destination.

Thorpe and Tiffin marriage certificate

Continuing with blogging about all the records I found recently …..

I came across a marriage certificate for Alfred James Thorpe and Emma Elizabeth Tiffin. They were married at St Philip’s Church in Stepney, London on June 13th 1897. His occupation was Bus Driver.

His father, Alfred Thorpe was a Cigar Maker. Her father William Tiffin was a Carman. I had to look up that occupation as I wasn’t familiar with it, but it looks like he was employed to drive horse-drawn vehicles for transporting goods.

Tiffin Thorpe marriage certificate

More results from the 1939 Register

Following on from yesterday’s post, here are some of my family living on the south coast at the time of the 1939 Register.

My other grandparents were living at 170 Portswood Road, Southampton. My grandfather was the Manager of a Wine, Beer and Spirits shop which they lived above.

1939 Register

My paternal great grandparents were living at ‘Aloma’ on Castleman’s Lane, Hayling Island. He was a retired Tinsmith.

Benger 1939 Register

My Homeyer relatives were living in Cardiff. Brother and sister, Charles and Adelaide, lived at 23 Treharris Street. He worked as a Clerk for the Local Authority Education Department.

1939 Register Homeyer

Musings on the 1939 Register

I seem to have collected a lot of information which I haven’t got round to using or putting in the proper place. Any one else or just me who has piles and piles of notes?

With thought of the 75th anniversary of VE Day I thought I would share some of my recent finds from the 1939 Register. This is a great source of information and I love tracking down family to see where they were.

In 1939 my grandparents were living in Badgeworth Road, Gloucester. My grandfather was an aircraft fitter and my grandmother undertaking unpaid domestic duties.

 

Over in Swindon I found my great-grandmother, along with two of her grown up and married children, living at 1 Whiteman Street. Her two daughters both worked in the Stemming Department at Wills Tobacco Factory.

I’m not sure why I didn’t track down other members of the family. I will have to add that to my to do list.