Category Archives: Young family

Wedding details of George Duncan and Ada Young

The wedding of George Duncan and Ada Selina Harriet Young happened on 11th May 1878 at the Register Office in Portsea Island.

George Duncan was aged 35 and a Surgeon

Ada Selina Harriet Young was aged 25

He was living at West Street, Fareham at the time of the wedding

She was living at Green Road, Portsea

His father was James Duncan, a Gentleman

Her father was Alfred Young (deceased) a Commander Royal Navy

The wedding was witnessed by (? illegible) Cleverly and J.W. Brough

Wedding details of William Cole and Blanche Young

The wedding of William St Clair Cole and Blanche Elizabeth Young took place at the Parish Church in Fareham, Southampton on December 23rd 1880.

William St Clair Cole was 25 years old and a Clerk

Blanche Elizabeth Young was 23 years old, both gave their residence as Fareham

His father was Robert Cole, a Clerk on Holy Order

Her father was Alfred Young, Captain Royal Navy

The wedding was witnessed by Mansel Young and Grace Amy Young, the brides’ brother and sister

Blanche Young was the sister of my great-grand-father, Mansel Young

 

Wedding details of Henry Homeyer and Grace Young

I thought I would document some of the certificates I have in no particular order.

Henry Charles Homeyer and Grace Amy Young were married at the Parish Church, St Mary the Virgin in Cardiff, Glamorgan, on May 29th 1889.

Henry Homeyer was aged 35 and a Boatswain

Grace Young was 27 and a Spinster

His address was the Steam Ship ‘Mark Lane’ (? illegible)

Her address was 77 Duncan Road, Southsea

His father’s name was Charles (? illegible) Homeyer, his profession was Secretary of Post Ofice

Her father was Alfred Young, Captain Royal Navy (dead)

The wedding was witnessed by Edward Gardiner and Amelia (? illegible) Gardiner

Grace Young was the younger sister of my great-grandfather, Henry Young.

Notes on executor’s application for money owed by the Royal Navy

My family history research has been quite quiet lately, real life takes precedence at the moment.

A couple of weeks ago I noticed there was free access of Ancestry which always makes me spend a little time searching for any useful information. As is often the case I didn’t find any new leads but I somehow ended up on the TNA website where I found a couple of possible records for Matthew Young:

ADM 45/34/477 (available to purchase)
Number: 477 Matthew Young, Commander Royal Navy, who died: 1 September 1855. Notes on executor’s application for money owed by the Royal Navy.
1855

ADM 9/8/2650 (not digitised)
Name: Matthew Young; Rank: Lieutenant; Date of Seniority: 13 Feb 1806.

ADM 6/242/6 (not digitised)
Greenwich out-pensioners applying for admission into Greenwich Hospital as in-pensioners (after service in the Royal Navy, Royal Marines or the Naval Dockyards)
1835 February 5

I purchased the first record as it was the only one available in digital format. There wasn’t much information on it but as above, it is Notes on executor’s application for money owed by the Royal Navy.

Matthew Young died on 10th September 1855. On the 24th September 1855 a claim was made by Charlotte Young, of Dunmore East, Killea, County of Waterford who was the Executress of his estate.

Apparently he had a will dated 2nd June 1854, it would be really interesting to get hold of this.

I’m not really sure what the outcome of this document means, there are a few dates on the form but they are pretty meaningless to me.

The Welsh cap badge

This Welsh cap badge was amongst my paternal Grandmothers possessions and given to me when she died.

The Welsh.JPG

It must have belonged to Alfred Mansel Young, her brother-in-law, as the name YOUNG has been scratched on the reverse.

The Admiralty Badge

I love this little buttonhole brass badge, found amongst the buttons in my grandmother’s button tin. I have no idea who it belonged to.

On War Service 1914

On War Service badge.JPG

The Admiralty Badge was issued to war workers in shipyards during 1914. In 1916 Admiralty badges were numbered to control their issue amongst the numerous shipyard and related employers.

The 1914 On War Service badge was the first official badge issued during the First World War to identify non-combatant persons whose services were deemed necessary for war work. The badge was issued late 1914 to “workmen whose services are indispensable for the rapid completion of HM Ships and Armaments”.

The issue of this badge to individuals considered essential for war work was left to the shipyards and related employers and if the employee were to cease that employment, the badge had to be handed back.

I think the badge may have belonged to one of my paternal great grandfathers, either George James Benger, who worked in Naval Ordnance in Portsmouth, or Mansel Young who worked as a Dockyard Labourer also in Portsmouth, during the First World War.