Category Archives: First World War

The Times Daily Casualty List

As I mentioned the other day I signed up for a free trial with The Genealogist and already I have found a new record! My great uncle is mentioned in the Daily Casualty List published in The Times, 4th September 1916.

Daily Casualty List

Missing and Killed in Action records go online

I recently read that The Genealogist has released some new records  from the First World War. This new release contains over 800,000 records. Included are 575,000 Killed in Action records, over 226,000 unique Missing-in-Action records and 14,000 Status Updates.

My great-uncle Alfred Mansel Young was killed in action in 1916 so I was interested to see if I could find out any more information about his death.

Unfortunately The Genealogist is a subscription site and although it looks like they might have some interesting records I can’t afford a subscription. However, they offer a 2 week free trial here so it looks like I shall be signing up later tonight to take a closer look!

Let’s #Remember together

Tonight I spent some time uploading information to the Lives of the First World War site about my great uncle Alfred Mansel Young (you can see his life story page here). As you all know, this weekend is Remembrance Sunday which seemed like the perfect time to encourage you to use the site too.

Alfred Mansel Young

The site is really easy to use:

Go to livesofthefirstworldwar.org

Who will you remember? – type in a surname (and service number, if known)

Find your connection in millions of Life Stories already started by IWM

Create a free account and press the ‘Remember’ button on the Life Story page – so everyone can see who you are Remembering

Use email, Facebook and Twitter to Share the link to the Life Story page with your family and friends.

Use #remember and #LivesOfWW1 to join the community remembering together on Twitter.

Who will you remember? Your First World War connection could be a relative who served, someone who shares your surname or a person listed on your local war memorial.

Upload your story to ensure that these Life Stories are remembered now and saved for future generations on Lives of the First World War.

 

The Welsh cap badge

This Welsh cap badge was amongst my paternal Grandmothers possessions and given to me when she died.

The Welsh.JPG

It must have belonged to Alfred Mansel Young, her brother-in-law, as the name YOUNG has been scratched on the reverse.

4.2 million British World War 1 service records released online in most comprehensive collection ever

Today findmypast released as part of their 100in100 campaign to release 100 record sets in 100 days the largest and most comprehensive collection of British World War 1 service records online, giving family historians a greater chance than ever before of finding their World War 1 ancestors. The newly re-indexed records contain details of millions of the men who fought for their country in one of the largest conflicts in history. As well as a more thorough transcription process which involved an individual examination of over 35 million pages of documentation, findmypast has also identified and indexed lists of names that were tucked away in individual service papers.

The record sets (WO363 and WO64, also colloquially known as the “burnt records”) are all that remain of records caught up in a fire caused by a German incendiary bomb during World War. As only around 40% of the original records survive, the addition of these 600,000 new names taken from extra lists and pages previously not indexed are a real boon to family historians with British military ancestors, as well as to military historians in general.

The records can be searched at http://search.findmypast.co.uk/search-world-Records/british-army-service-records-1914-1920 and are available on all international findmypast sites as part of a world subscription.

The Admiralty Badge

I love this little buttonhole brass badge, found amongst the buttons in my grandmother’s button tin. I have no idea who it belonged to.

On War Service 1914

On War Service badge.JPG

The Admiralty Badge was issued to war workers in shipyards during 1914. In 1916 Admiralty badges were numbered to control their issue amongst the numerous shipyard and related employers.

The 1914 On War Service badge was the first official badge issued during the First World War to identify non-combatant persons whose services were deemed necessary for war work. The badge was issued late 1914 to “workmen whose services are indispensable for the rapid completion of HM Ships and Armaments”.

The issue of this badge to individuals considered essential for war work was left to the shipyards and related employers and if the employee were to cease that employment, the badge had to be handed back.

I think the badge may have belonged to one of my paternal great grandfathers, either George James Benger, who worked in Naval Ordnance in Portsmouth, or Mansel Young who worked as a Dockyard Labourer also in Portsmouth, during the First World War.