Missing and Killed in Action records go online

I recently read that The Genealogist has released some new records  from the First World War. This new release contains over 800,000 records. Included are 575,000 Killed in Action records, over 226,000 unique Missing-in-Action records and 14,000 Status Updates.

My great-uncle Alfred Mansel Young was killed in action in 1916 so I was interested to see if I could find out any more information about his death.

Unfortunately The Genealogist is a subscription site and although it looks like they might have some interesting records I can’t afford a subscription. However, they offer a 2 week free trial here so it looks like I shall be signing up later tonight to take a closer look!

Using the new Find A Will online service

Yesterday I was reading about the new Find A Will online service which replaces the old Probate Office in Holborn. I visited the old place a few times and enjoyed looking through their old record books, finding relevant records and ordering copies to take home and add to my own records.

I’ve been meaning to go back for a while so was pretty pleased to hear about the new online service which I tried out this evening.

The service is still in beta and has a surprisingly basic search – just surname and date. You can search for Wills and Probate 1996 to present,  Wills and Probate 1858 – 1996 and Soldier’s Wills.

If there are any results you can look at the original page which features a short summary – name, amount of estate, enough information to help you identify them as the person you are looking for  and the name of the Executor. You can also look at the entries either side of your result as well as the previous or next year.

I’ve only spent about an hour using the site but so far found 1 result for George Caswell, a distant relative through my paternal great-grandfather. I’m tempted to order a copy of the Will even though I already know he left his estate, which was under £800, to his only daughter Selina Cleopatra Anne Caswell.

Let’s #Remember together

Tonight I spent some time uploading information to the Lives of the First World War site about my great uncle Alfred Mansel Young (you can see his life story page here). As you all know, this weekend is Remembrance Sunday which seemed like the perfect time to encourage you to use the site too.

Alfred Mansel Young

The site is really easy to use:

Go to livesofthefirstworldwar.org

Who will you remember? – type in a surname (and service number, if known)

Find your connection in millions of Life Stories already started by IWM

Create a free account and press the ‘Remember’ button on the Life Story page – so everyone can see who you are Remembering

Use email, Facebook and Twitter to Share the link to the Life Story page with your family and friends.

Use #remember and #LivesOfWW1 to join the community remembering together on Twitter.

Who will you remember? Your First World War connection could be a relative who served, someone who shares your surname or a person listed on your local war memorial.

Upload your story to ensure that these Life Stories are remembered now and saved for future generations on Lives of the First World War.

 

Explore Findmypast’s billions of historical records for FREE this Remembrance Weekend

I thought the attached press release I received from Findmypast might be useful:

This Remembrance Weekend, we want to help everyone find their First World War ancestors and learn more about their family history.

So we’re delighted to announce that this Remembrance Weekend, we’ll be opening up our archives and giving unlimited free access to billions of records and newspaper pages from all over the world. That means that between midday on Friday, November 7th and midday on Monday, November 10th (GMT), absolutely everyone will have access to all our historical records, including:

·         Millions of birth, marriage and death records
·         Census, land and substitute records from the US, UK, Ireland and Australia
·         Millions of newspaper pages from all over the world
·         Travel and migration records
·         Military records from all over the world, including World War 1 records

As well as millions of other records that will give everyone the opportunity to explore their family history and bring their past to life.

Live Broadcast

This Saturday 8th November, we will be hosting our first ever Live Broadcast. Featuring an expert panel including Findmypast’s Director of Family History, Joshua Taylor, military historian Paul Nixon, and Who Do You Think You Are?’s Lead Genealogist Laura Berry, the broadcast is designed to help everyone get further with their family history research.

The talks will cover a wide range of topics – from getting started to breaking down brick walls – and viewers can choose to watch the entire event, or tune in for specific presentations.

The Live Broadcast will be shown at 3pm (GMT) on Saturday 8th November. All of the presentations can also be watched on demand after the broadcast on the Remembrance Weekend section of our blog.

Live Family History Facebook Q&A

Directly after our Live Broadcast, we’ll also be hosting a live Q&A on family history researching on our global Facebook page with some of our speakers. Join us between 5.30 and 6.30pm (GMT) to join the discussion on how to get started or break down your family history brick walls.

You can submit your questions in advance to our Facebook wall, send them @Findmypast on Twitter using the hashtag #FMPLive, or join us live on Facebook on Saturday evening.

Follow @Findmypast on Twitter and use the hashtag #FMPLive to follow our event updates.

Wedding details of George Duncan and Ada Young

The wedding of George Duncan and Ada Selina Harriet Young happened on 11th May 1878 at the Register Office in Portsea Island.

George Duncan was aged 35 and a Surgeon

Ada Selina Harriet Young was aged 25

He was living at West Street, Fareham at the time of the wedding

She was living at Green Road, Portsea

His father was James Duncan, a Gentleman

Her father was Alfred Young (deceased) a Commander Royal Navy

The wedding was witnessed by (? illegible) Cleverly and J.W. Brough

Wedding details of William Cole and Blanche Young

The wedding of William St Clair Cole and Blanche Elizabeth Young took place at the Parish Church in Fareham, Southampton on December 23rd 1880.

William St Clair Cole was 25 years old and a Clerk

Blanche Elizabeth Young was 23 years old, both gave their residence as Fareham

His father was Robert Cole, a Clerk on Holy Order

Her father was Alfred Young, Captain Royal Navy

The wedding was witnessed by Mansel Young and Grace Amy Young, the brides’ brother and sister

Blanche Young was the sister of my great-grand-father, Mansel Young